Electron configuration calculator with steps - Easy to use

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An Electron configuration calculator is an online tool that will help you to find the electron configuration for any atom right away. Electron configuration is the arrangement of electrons in atomic orbitals. It represents the electrons in numbers. Electron configuration is used to predict the properties of a group of elements.

Electron Configuration Calculator

 

How to use the Electron configuration calculator?

In three steps, you can get electron configuration for any element, let’s see how it works.

  • Enter the name or symbol of the atom in the given blank box.
  • Click the calculate button
  • After submission, the electron configuration of the given element will be shown in general form and in short form as well.

For example –

Let’s say you have to calculate the Electron configuration for Sodium.

⇒ Enter either the Sodium or the “Na” symbol in the given empty box of the Electron configuration calculator.

step 1 for using Electron configuration calculator

⇒ Click the calculate button

step 2 for using Electron configuration calculator

⇒ The “Electron configuration calculator” will calculate the electron configuration for the Sodium atom and you will get your answer.

step 3 for using Electron configuration calculator

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How to Calculate Electron configuration?

To calculate the electron configuration of elements, we will use the Aufbau principle, for that, we have to first find the total number of electrons in a given element, then we have to fill the orbitals with electrons from lower energy to higher energy, i.e. the electrons will be filled into 1s orbital first then 2s, then 2p…so on.

Aufbau Principle:

  • The word ‘Aufbau’ in German means ‘building up’.
  • The Aufbau rule simply gives the order of electrons filling in the orbital of an atom in its ground state.
  • It states that the orbital with the lowest energy level will be filled first before those with high energy levels. In short, the electrons will be filled in the orbital in order of their increasing energies.
  • For example, the 1s orbital will be filled first with electrons before the 2s orbital.

Simply understand that there are commonly four different types of subshells – s, p, d, and, f.

These subshells can hold a maximum number of electrons on the basis of a formula, 2(2l + 1) where ‘l’ is the azimuthal quantum number.

Value of ‘l’ for different subshells.

SubshellsValue of ‘l’Maximum number of electrons, 2(2l + 1)Number of orbitals in the subshell
s021
p163
d2105
f3147

So, in short, the s subshell can hold a maximum of 2 electrons(1 orbital), the p subshell can hold 6 electrons(3 orbitals), the d subshell can hold 10 electrons(5 orbitals), and the f subshell can hold at most 14 electrons(7 orbitals).

Now, the electron configuration of an atom can be built by filling the electrons in a lower energy subshell first then higher, higher, and higher.

Generally, (n + l) rule is used to predict the energy level of subshells.

n = principle quantum number

l = Azimuthal quantum number

⇒ Lower the value of (n + l) for an subshell, the lower its energy, hence, it will be filled first with electrons.

⇒ For two different subshells having same (n + l) value, then the subshell with lower value of n has lower energy.

So, all these are basics of How filling of electrons will be done in different subshells, obviously, you don’t have so much time for calculating electron configuration by using so many rules.

Therefore, we have a diagonal rule for electron filling order in the different subshells using the Aufbau principle.

How to calculate Electron configuration using Aufbau Principle

So, the order in which the orbitals are filled with electrons from lower energy to higher energy is – 1s < 2s < 2p < 3s < 3p < 4s < 3d < 4p < 5s < 4d < 5p < 6s < 4f < 5d < 6p < 7s < 5f < 6d < 7p and so on.

Note: S orbital can hold maximum of 2 electrons, P orbital can hold 6 electrons, D orbital can hold 10 electrons, and F orbital can hold maximum of 14 electrons.

Let’s take an example to understand How to calculate the electron configuration for elements using the Aufbau principle.

How to calculate the electron configuration of Carbon using the Aufbau Principle?

First of all, to calculate the electron configuration for Carbon, we have to find the total number of electrons in it.

“The number of electrons in an atom is equal to the atomic number of an element, for neutrally charged species.”

  • So, a Carbon atom is a neutral atom that has 6 atomic numbers which implies it has a total of 6 electrons.
  • As per the Aufbau rule, the electrons will be filled into 1s orbital first then 2s, then 2p…so on.
  • Now, for the electron configuration of Carbon, the first 2 electrons will go in 1s orbital since s subshell can hold a maximum of 2 electrons.
  • The next two electrons will go in the 2s orbital, after that, we are left with 2 electrons, these will go in the 2p orbital since the p subshell can hold a maximum of 6 electrons.
  • Therefore, the electron configuration of Carbon will be 1s22s22p2.

How to calculate Electron configuration of Carbon

How to calculate the electron configuration of Magnesium using the Aufbau Principle?

  • A Magnesium atom is a neutral atom that has an atomic number of 12 which implies it has a total of 12 electrons.
  • As per the Aufbau rule, the electrons will be filled into 1s orbital first then 2s, then 2p…so on.
  • Now, for the electron configuration of Magnesium, the first 2 electrons will go in 1s orbital since s subshell can hold a maximum of 2 electrons.
  • The next two electrons will go into the 2s orbital, after that, the next 6 electrons will go into the 2p orbital since the p subshell can hold up to 6 electrons.
  • Now, we are left with 2 electrons, this will go in a 3s orbital.
  • Therefore, the electron configuration of Magnesium will be 1s22s22p63s2.

How to calculate Electron configuration of Magnesium

How to calculate the electron configuration of Potassium using the Aufbau Principle?

  • A Potassium atom is a neutral atom that has an atomic number of 19 which implies it has a total of 19 electrons.
  • As per the Aufbau rule, the electrons will be filled into 1s orbital first then 2s, then 2p…so on.
  • Now, for the electron configuration of Potassium, the first 2 electrons will go in 1s orbital since s subshell can hold a maximum of 2 electrons.
  • The next two electrons will go into the 2s orbital, after that, the next 6 electrons will go into the 2p orbital since the p subshell can hold up to 6 electrons.
  • The next two electrons will go into the 3s orbital, and after that, the next six electrons will go into the 3p orbital, finally, the remaining one electron will go into the 4s orbital.
  • Therefore, the electron configuration of Potassium will be 1s22s22p63s23p64s1.

How to calculate Electron configuration of Potassium

That’s all, It is the simplest method to calculate the electron configuration for a given element. For the first 30 elements in the periodic table, we must know How to find their electron configuration.

The electron configuration for the first 30 elements – 

Atomic numberName of the ElementsElectron configuration
1Hydrogen electron configuration1s1
2Helium electron configuration1s2
3Lithium electron configuration1s22s1
4Beryllium electron configuration1s22s2
5Boron electron configuration1s22s2 2p1
6Carbon electron configuration1s22s2 2p2
7Nitrogen electron configuration1s22s2 2p3
8Oxygen electron configuration1s22s2 2p4
9Fluorine electron configuration1s22s2 2p5
10Neon electron configuration1s22s2 2p6
11Sodium electron configuration1s22s2 2p63s1
12Magnesium electron configuration1s22s2 2p63s2
13Aluminum electron configuration1s22s2 2p63s2 3p1
14Silicon electron configuration1s22s2 2p63s2 3p2
15Phosphorus electron configuration1s22s2 2p63s2 3p3
16Sulfur electron configuration1s22s2 2p63s2 3p4
17Chlorine electron configuration1s22s2 2p63s2 3p5
18Argon electron configuration1s22s2 2p63s2 3p6
19Potassium electron configuration1s22s2 2p63s2 3p64s1
20Calcium electron configuration1s22s2 2p63s2 3p64s2
21Scandium electron configuration1s22s2 2p63s2 3p63d1 4s2
22Titanium electron configuration1s22s2 2p63s2 3p63d2 4s2
23Vanadium electron configuration1s22s2 2p63s2 3p63d3 4s2
24Chromium electron configuration1s22s2 2p63s2 3p63d5 4s1
25Manganese electron configuration1s22s2 2p63s2 3p63d5 4s2
26Iron electron configuration1s22s2 2p63s2 3p63d6 4s2
27Cobalt electron configuration1s22s2 2p63s2 3p63d7 4s2
28Nickel electron configuration1s22s2 2p63s2 3p63d8 4s2
29Copper electron configuration1s22s2 2p63s2 3p63d10 4s1
30Zinc electron configuration1s22s2 2p63s2 3p63d10 4s2

In the above list of the first 30 elements of electron configuration, there are two exceptions, the first is Chromium(Cr), and the second is Copper(Cu). They violate the Aufbau principle rule to get more stability.

The remaining 28 elements have electron configuration as proposed by the Aufbau principle rule.

Let’s understand it.

The actual electron configuration for Chromium is 1s22s2 2p63s2 3p63d5 4s1, and not 1s22s2 2p63s2 3p63d4 4s2(as proposed by the Aufbau principle).

Same as the actual electron configuration for Copper is 1s22s2 2p63s2 3p63d10 4s1, and not 1s22s2 2p63s2 3p63d9 4s2(as proposed by the Aufbau principle).

“The reason for being this, they deviate from normal electronic configuration to get extra stability by half-filled and fulfilled configuration.”

“The completely filled d-orbital offers more stability than the partially filled configuration.”

“There are two main exceptions to electron configuration: chromium and copper. In these cases, a completely full or half full d sub-level is more stable than a partially filled d sub-level, so an electron from the 4s orbital is excited and rises to a 3d orbital.”

FAQ

 The easiest way to calculate the electronic configuration for any element is by using a diagonal rule for electron filling order in the different subshells according to the Aufbau principle.

How do you calculate an electron configuration quickly?

By using the diagonal rule of the Aufbau principle, we can calculate electron configuration quickly. All we have to do is to remember the order in which the orbital is filled with electrons from lower energy to higher energy.

The order of calculating the electron configuration is – 1s < 2s < 2p < 3s < 3p < 4s < 3d < 4p < 5s < 4d < 5p < 6s < 4f < 5d < 6p < 7s < 5f < 6d < 7p and so on.

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Welcome to Topblogtenz, My name is Vishal Goyal. I am an engineer, chemistry tutor, blogger, and founder of topblogtenz.com. I'm a science geek with a passion for life sciences and chemistry. Being a chemistry tutor and having a degree in Engineering, I know how hard it is to learn by yourself, that is why I created a site where you can find help related to science and chemistry before everyone else.

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